INTERREMINDER n. [Fr. interrupt + remind]: My five-year-old daughter recently coined the word. Example, “We always have to interreminder our teacher to use the purple marker.” Submitted by Tabitha and her daughter, Tovah.
(Thanks, Tabitha and Tovah. Yes, we have interreminders in my house. There seem to be two themes:
1) They occur when I am on the phone.
2) They begin with, “You said…”
Let’s say that I am on an important phone call. Imagine that one of my children is sick and I’m trying to schedule a doctor’s appointment. It is inevitable that one of my speaking children will interrupt. “You said we can have some Halloween candy.”
"Shhh… Mommy’s on the phone."
Two seconds pass.
"You said we can have some Halloween candy."
I repeat, louder, “Mommy’s on the phone.” ((I told you before, I speak in third person all the time to my kids. I am too annoying for words.))
One second passes.
"You said we can have some Halloween candy."
That’s when I pull out my trademarked WHISPER-YELL and switch to first-person, “I AM ON THE PHONE. I NEED YOU TO BE QUIET. HALLOWEEN WAS SIX MONTHS AGO. THERE IS NO CANDY. I ATE IT ALL. I MEAN, THE CANDY WENT AWAY. AND IF YOU CAN’T BE QUIET, THERE WILL BE NO CANDY… EVER.”)

INTERREMINDER n. [Fr. interrupt + remind]: My five-year-old daughter recently coined the word. Example, “We always have to interreminder our teacher to use the purple marker.” Submitted by Tabitha and her daughter, Tovah.

(Thanks, Tabitha and Tovah. Yes, we have interreminders in my house. There seem to be two themes:

1) They occur when I am on the phone.

2) They begin with, “You said…”

Let’s say that I am on an important phone call. Imagine that one of my children is sick and I’m trying to schedule a doctor’s appointment. It is inevitable that one of my speaking children will interrupt. “You said we can have some Halloween candy.”

"Shhh… Mommy’s on the phone."

Two seconds pass.

"You said we can have some Halloween candy."

I repeat, louder, “Mommy’s on the phone.” ((I told you before, I speak in third person all the time to my kids. I am too annoying for words.))

One second passes.

"You said we can have some Halloween candy."

That’s when I pull out my trademarked WHISPER-YELL and switch to first-person, “I AM ON THE PHONE. I NEED YOU TO BE QUIET. HALLOWEEN WAS SIX MONTHS AGO. THERE IS NO CANDY. I ATE IT ALL. I MEAN, THE CANDY WENT AWAY. AND IF YOU CAN’T BE QUIET, THERE WILL BE NO CANDY… EVER.”)

MOMIFORM n. [Fr. mom + uniform] The template for an outfit that you utilize every day, rarely changing any aspect of it too much. It works for you and so you repeat it over and over and over. (Submitted by Sara of Portland, Oregon who is the founder of the blog, Portland Sunshine.)There will be more words from Sara in the future, so come back early and often. I’m actually very happy that Sara sent this in. This word is incredibly appropriate for me. I do have just a couple of “momiforms” that I wear pretty much every day in the fall, winter and spring. 1) Black leggings, black boots, and a long shirt — no pattern with the exception of stripes. 2) Jeans, sneakers or boots, and a long shirt — no pattern with the exception of stripes or plaid. That’s it!
Until Sara introduced me to this wonderful word, I’ve never admitted to myself (let alone publicly) that I may have a problem. Perhaps I am in a bit of a style rut? I feel like one of those women whose friends surprise them with a makeover on national television. (By the way, if anyone ever does this to me, I will kill them. So, consider yourself warned.) You know those women who end up on “Oprah” because they’ve had the same haircut for twenty years? Well… uh.. I’ve had the same haircut for about twenty years. (I cut it once, and I hated it.) I don’t know about changing the rest. I’m pretty comfortable in my style rut. What about you? Do you have a "momiform”? Have you changed your hair in the last 20 years?

MOMIFORM n. [Fr. mom + uniform] The template for an outfit that you utilize every day, rarely changing any aspect of it too much. It works for you and so you repeat it over and over and over. (Submitted by Sara of Portland, Oregon who is the founder of the blog, Portland Sunshine.)

There will be more words from Sara in the future, so come back early and often. I’m actually very happy that Sara sent this in. This word is incredibly appropriate for me. I do have just a couple of “momiforms” that I wear pretty much every day in the fall, winter and spring. 1) Black leggings, black boots, and a long shirt — no pattern with the exception of stripes. 2) Jeans, sneakers or boots, and a long shirt — no pattern with the exception of stripes or plaid. That’s it!

Until Sara introduced me to this wonderful word, I’ve never admitted to myself (let alone publicly) that I may have a problem. Perhaps I am in a bit of a style rut? I feel like one of those women whose friends surprise them with a makeover on national television. (By the way, if anyone ever does this to me, I will kill them. So, consider yourself warned.) You know those women who end up on “Oprah” because they’ve had the same haircut for twenty years? Well… uh.. I’ve had the same haircut for about twenty years. (I cut it once, and I hated it.) I don’t know about changing the rest. I’m pretty comfortable in my style rut. What about you? Do you have a "momiform”? Have you changed your hair in the last 20 years?

KIDPRESSION n. [Fr. impression + of kid] An impression of your child or an attempt to re-enact that cute thing your child did, when your child is not present. My husband and I replay anything adorable our daughter says or does for the other parent. “Honey, this morning I got out the toothbrush and she said, ‘Toofpays peeeese, mommy,’” or “She held her doll up after nap and said, ‘ba-bee dis hundree, eat beans!’” Now, I think this is perfectly acceptable in the privacy of our own home. We are trying to keep the other parent updated, and celebrate that our kid learning to talk is cuter than a baby bunny snuggling a penguin. Where it gets embarrassing is when we realize we are doing this at work and with our friends. Today my husband admitted that his boss asked him how he was doing and he replied, “I’m fine. This morning my baby came running up to me and said, ‘Daddy! Dis sunny o’side! Pee pee potty!’” He used a comically high voice, with wide eyes and a spot-on lisp. At work. To his boss. Submitted by Andrea of the Tumblr abecomingmotherhood. 
(Andrea, I love you. Oops. I mean, I love this. And, I just had to post this on a Monday morning because I assume that’s when most of these occur in offices and cubicles all over the country. “How was your weekend, Bob?” And then Bob launches into baby talk. Remember, friends don’t let friends do kidpressions in front of non-immediate family. And “baby bunny snuggling a penguin” will be the first entry in my new blog, This-Made-Up-Phrase-Is-Hysterical.)

KIDPRESSION n. [Fr. impression + of kid] An impression of your child or an attempt to re-enact that cute thing your child did, when your child is not present. My husband and I replay anything adorable our daughter says or does for the other parent. “Honey, this morning I got out the toothbrush and she said, ‘Toofpays peeeese, mommy,’” or “She held her doll up after nap and said, ‘ba-bee dis hundree, eat beans!’” Now, I think this is perfectly acceptable in the privacy of our own home. We are trying to keep the other parent updated, and celebrate that our kid learning to talk is cuter than a baby bunny snuggling a penguin. Where it gets embarrassing is when we realize we are doing this at work and with our friends. Today my husband admitted that his boss asked him how he was doing and he replied, “I’m fine. This morning my baby came running up to me and said, ‘Daddy! Dis sunny o’side! Pee pee potty!’” He used a comically high voice, with wide eyes and a spot-on lisp. At work. To his boss. Submitted by Andrea of the Tumblr abecomingmotherhood.

(Andrea, I love you. Oops. I mean, I love this. And, I just had to post this on a Monday morning because I assume that’s when most of these occur in offices and cubicles all over the country. “How was your weekend, Bob?” And then Bob launches into baby talk. Remember, friends don’t let friends do kidpressions in front of non-immediate family. And “baby bunny snuggling a penguin” will be the first entry in my new blog, This-Made-Up-Phrase-Is-Hysterical.)

This is a photo from the blog, Things Organized Neatly. I am only reblogging just to give you a sense of how my family room looks when the kids and I clean up together each evening. You should see what we do with the Legos. Also, there seems to be something written in the middle and I can’t read it. Can you? I hope it’s not something awful. Like, here I am thinking it says something along the lines of, “Have a great day!” and instead it’s an old Andrew Dice Clay bit.
Thanks, Michael for the heads up on this one.

This is a photo from the blog, Things Organized Neatly. I am only reblogging just to give you a sense of how my family room looks when the kids and I clean up together each evening. You should see what we do with the Legos. Also, there seems to be something written in the middle and I can’t read it. Can you? I hope it’s not something awful. Like, here I am thinking it says something along the lines of, “Have a great day!” and instead it’s an old Andrew Dice Clay bit.

Thanks, Michael for the heads up on this one.

(via michaelkemp)

OBCD n. [Fr. Obsessive Breath Checking Disorder] A diagnosis most common among new mothers, symptoms include obsessively staring at a baby’s chest to ensure the rise and fall caused by normal breathing, constant placement of the mother’s hand on baby’s chest to feel this motion, and frequent “breathing checks” when baby is sleeping.
(This was submitted by Ellen from West End, NC. I recommend that you take a hop, skip and a jump over to her blog, Emomme — specifically, to the post where it all began. Ellen begins with the question that WE ALL get asked, “Is your baby sleeping through the night?” Let’s all take a moment to collectively answer, “No!” ((And if you can’t answer “no,” then for the love of God don’t tell me.)) What I like so much about Ellen’s post is it illustrates how we all have to do what works best for the baby and for ourselves ((as long as it’s safe)). I feel this way about sleep. I feel this way about breastfeeding v. formula. I feel this way about what kind of diapers I use. I feel this way about how often I shower. ((Okay, not really. Okay, yes really.)) So, when you read Ellen’s post on her blog, just remember that as long as you love your kiddo to pieces, I, for one, think you’re doing it right. ((Although who gives a crap what I think?)) And, obviously, there are times when we do not love our kiddos to pieces. But that’s another post for another time. Thank you, Ellen, for your honesty and for sharing your experience with us.)  
What about you? Does your baby sleep through the night? (Just kidding). But, what kind of experiences with sleep did you have? Any advice? Any regrets? Do you prefer Starbucks or Dunkin’ Donuts coffee? 
Also, if you read as many sleep books as I did, you might appreciate a parody I wrote for Babble a few months ago. If you don’t like it, it doesn’t matter, the check already cleared.

OBCD n. [Fr. Obsessive Breath Checking Disorder] A diagnosis most common among new mothers, symptoms include obsessively staring at a baby’s chest to ensure the rise and fall caused by normal breathing, constant placement of the mother’s hand on baby’s chest to feel this motion, and frequent “breathing checks” when baby is sleeping.

(This was submitted by Ellen from West End, NC. I recommend that you take a hop, skip and a jump over to her blog, Emomme — specifically, to the post where it all began. Ellen begins with the question that WE ALL get asked, “Is your baby sleeping through the night?” Let’s all take a moment to collectively answer, “No!” ((And if you can’t answer “no,” then for the love of God don’t tell me.)) What I like so much about Ellen’s post is it illustrates how we all have to do what works best for the baby and for ourselves ((as long as it’s safe)). I feel this way about sleep. I feel this way about breastfeeding v. formula. I feel this way about what kind of diapers I use. I feel this way about how often I shower. ((Okay, not really. Okay, yes really.)) So, when you read Ellen’s post on her blog, just remember that as long as you love your kiddo to pieces, I, for one, think you’re doing it right. ((Although who gives a crap what I think?)) And, obviously, there are times when we do not love our kiddos to pieces. But that’s another post for another time. Thank you, Ellen, for your honesty and for sharing your experience with us.)  

What about you? Does your baby sleep through the night? (Just kidding). But, what kind of experiences with sleep did you have? Any advice? Any regrets? Do you prefer Starbucks or Dunkin’ Donuts coffee? 

Also, if you read as many sleep books as I did, you might appreciate a parody I wrote for Babble a few months ago. If you don’t like it, it doesn’t matter, the check already cleared.

BAMBOOBZLE v. [Fr. to deceive/confuse + boob] To accidentally spray your baby in the face with milk when nursing. Submitted by Kristy from Los Angeles. Kristy maintains two (TWO!) blogs. You can follow Kristy at Misadventures of Being a Mom and My Dear Oliver.
And, as you know, you can only follow me here. I mean, sure, for a while, I considered starting a blog where I just superimposed my face in pictures with Jon Hamm. But I decided that Jennifer Westfeldt probably wouldn’t like it. And I don’t want to upset her since Kissing Jessica Stein is one of my favorite movies. Other favorites? Dog Day Afternoon, Breakfast Club, All About Eve, Singing in the Rain — I’m all over the place. (Would my husband be upset about my Jon Hamm blog? Let’s just say, he’s not exactly worried that Jon and I are going to run off together.) Okay, so enough about Jon Hamm — except I do want to mention that I read in Wikipedia (so it’s totally, 100 percent true) that his first friend in Hollywood was Paul Rudd. Sigh. That’s my other… I digress. Back to BAMBOOBZLE.
Oddly enough, babies are not the only ones who’ve been bamboobzled. Here’s an excerpt from a 2007 story.  “…An 18-year old woman was caught trying to steal a pair of shoes from a store…. Once XXXX was caught by police for her shoplifting scheme, she went on to assault the police officers in a rather unusual, unheard of way. XXXX promptly took out her right breast, took aim, and shot breast milk from her right breast at a police officer. XXXX was then detained by police and brought down to jail. XXXX is being held accountable for shoplifting, and an assault charge for the breast milk incident.” If anyone from Marvel Comics is reading this (and I’m sure they are), I think there’s some good material here for a new Superhero – one who fights crimes, though, instead of committing them. The name “Wonder Woman” is taken. Maybe we’d call her, “Super Mamms.” And, yes, even though I linked to the story, I’m not using the name of the woman in my own blog who allegedly sprayed breast milk at the police officers because if it was me, I wouldn’t want my name used. It wasn’t me though. Not in this particular story. I haven’t BEEN CAUGHT spraying my breast milk at police officers. Not yet. It’s probably because I can run really, really fast.

BAMBOOBZLE v. [Fr. to deceive/confuse + boob] To accidentally spray your baby in the face with milk when nursing. Submitted by Kristy from Los Angeles. Kristy maintains two (TWO!) blogs. You can follow Kristy at Misadventures of Being a Mom and My Dear Oliver.

And, as you know, you can only follow me here. I mean, sure, for a while, I considered starting a blog where I just superimposed my face in pictures with Jon Hamm. But I decided that Jennifer Westfeldt probably wouldn’t like it. And I don’t want to upset her since Kissing Jessica Stein is one of my favorite movies. Other favorites? Dog Day Afternoon, Breakfast Club, All About Eve, Singing in the Rain — I’m all over the place. (Would my husband be upset about my Jon Hamm blog? Let’s just say, he’s not exactly worried that Jon and I are going to run off together.) Okay, so enough about Jon Hamm — except I do want to mention that I read in Wikipedia (so it’s totally, 100 percent true) that his first friend in Hollywood was Paul Rudd. Sigh. That’s my other… I digress. Back to BAMBOOBZLE.

Oddly enough, babies are not the only ones who’ve been bamboobzled. Here’s an excerpt from a 2007 story.  “…An 18-year old woman was caught trying to steal a pair of shoes from a store…. Once XXXX was caught by police for her shoplifting scheme, she went on to assault the police officers in a rather unusual, unheard of way. XXXX promptly took out her right breast, took aim, and shot breast milk from her right breast at a police officer. XXXX was then detained by police and brought down to jail. XXXX is being held accountable for shoplifting, and an assault charge for the breast milk incident.” If anyone from Marvel Comics is reading this (and I’m sure they are), I think there’s some good material here for a new Superhero – one who fights crimes, though, instead of committing them. The name “Wonder Woman” is taken. Maybe we’d call her, “Super Mamms.” And, yes, even though I linked to the story, I’m not using the name of the woman in my own blog who allegedly sprayed breast milk at the police officers because if it was me, I wouldn’t want my name used. It wasn’t me though. Not in this particular story. I haven’t BEEN CAUGHT spraying my breast milk at police officers. Not yet. It’s probably because I can run really, really fast.

NIPPLETASKING v. [Fr. nipple + multitasking] When your baby is sucking, but ALSO, humming, trying to talk, kicking his leg(s), pounding his arm(s), wiggling his fingers, rolling his eyes, batting his eyelashes and generally twisting all over the place - all at the same time. Submitted by Helen, in Osaka, Japan.

(I received Helen’s email this morning. You – like me – probably wanted to know how Helen and her family were faring in light of the disaster.  Helen explained that Osaka is southwest of the hardest hit areas. However, “…we’re definitely all quite on edge… Life with a baby continues though – and is a very welcome diversion from all this!” 

I’d feel pretty remiss if I didn’t mention that there are many, many ways in which we can help those who were affected or who will be affected by the tragedy. Here’s just one link: Mercy Corps meets all twenty of the Better Business Bureau’s standards for charity accountability, and Charity Navigator gave it its highest rating in organizational efficiency. Donations to Mercy Corps will help both the immediate and the long-term needs of earthquake survivors. If you have other organizations that you support and would like to give them a “plug,” please help draw awareness to them by commenting below. And, yes, I am aware that this post began with the word, “nippletasking.”)

NIPPLETASKING v. [Fr. nipple + multitasking] When your baby is sucking, but ALSO, humming, trying to talk, kicking his leg(s), pounding his arm(s), wiggling his fingers, rolling his eyes, batting his eyelashes and generally twisting all over the place - all at the same time. Submitted by Helen, in Osaka, Japan.

(I received Helen’s email this morning. You – like me – probably wanted to know how Helen and her family were faring in light of the disaster.  Helen explained that Osaka is southwest of the hardest hit areas. However, “…we’re definitely all quite on edge… Life with a baby continues though – and is a very welcome diversion from all this!” 

I’d feel pretty remiss if I didn’t mention that there are many, many ways in which we can help those who were affected or who will be affected by the tragedy. Here’s just one link: Mercy Corps meets all twenty of the Better Business Bureau’s standards for charity accountability, and Charity Navigator gave it its highest rating in organizational efficiency. Donations to Mercy Corps will help both the immediate and the long-term needs of earthquake survivors. If you have other organizations that you support and would like to give them a “plug,” please help draw awareness to them by commenting below. And, yes, I am aware that this post began with the word, “nippletasking.”)